Houliston Genealogy Online


David M Houliston

Male 1830 - 1861  (31 years)


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  • Name David M Houliston 
    Born 1830  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 18 October 1861  Camp Ewing, Gauley Mountain, WV, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Typhoid 
    Notes 
    • ====================================================================================
      New York, 1820-1850 Passenger and Immigration Lists
      recorded as Houlsten & Houlstin on the web
      NEED COPY OF ORIGINAL IMAGE TO REVIEW
      Arrival Date Port of Departure Place of Origin Ship
      Jul 23, 1834 Bristol Berwinkshire [Berwickshire], England Ship Cosmo
      Name Age Gender
      George Houlsten 56 M farmer
      Agnes Houlsten 42 F
      A. G. Houlsten 18 M
      Andrew Houlsten 15 M
      William Houlsten 14 M
      Ann Houlsten 9 F
      David Houlsten 5 M
      ====================================================================================
      1840 USA census - [Horace Stuk?] Willoughby, Lake Co., OH, USA:
      George Honlisatow (head of household)
      Males
      5-9 x1 (presume son David)
      15-19 x1 (presume son William)
      60-69 x1 (presume George self)
      Females
      10-14 x2 (presume daughter Ann Mclean and ?)
      30-39 x1 (presume ?)
      40-49 x1 (presume wife Agnes)
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      1850 USA census - Buffalo Ward 2, Erie Co., NY, USA:
      Andrew Houliston 30 M Broker England
      Charlotte Houliston 30 F England
      Agnes Houliston 13 F Ohio
      David Houliston 19 M England
      Rich'd Deshard 30 M Clerk Ireland
      Susan Deshard 20 F NY
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      1860 USA census - Willoughby, Lake, OH:
      Name Age Birthplace
      David Holliston 28 Scotland
      Mc Lean Holliston 18 Ohio
      Agnes Holliston 72 Scotland
      =======================================================================

      =========================
      * Painesville Telegraph*
      The Telegraph was published from 1822 until April 1986.
      At this time the index below covers the years of 1822 through 1875.
      ..
      HOUK FREDERICK 1873 PG 3 COL 6 16TH TO HATTIE ALLEN
      HOULISTON DAVID M. 1861 PG 3 COL 3 DEATH WHILE SERVING
      HOULISTON MRS. 1875 PG 3 COL 6 MOTHER OF ANDREW & Wm, NOTICE
      HOULISTON MRS. AGNES 1875 PG 3 COL 7 WIDOW OF GEO., NOTICE
      HOUSE ALBERT P. 1875 PG 3 COL 8 17TH TO SUSAN A. RIDDELL
      ...
      Send mail to lrmcgrattan@yahoo.com with questions or comments about this web site.
      Copyright © 2004 Genealogical Roots in Newspapers
      Last modified: October 01, 2004
      =========================

      Gravestone in Lake County, Willoughby Village Cemetery Section K Row 11
      [E face] Wm. A. Houliston/ Born Feb. 4, 1820./ Died Dec. 17, 1896./ Jane, his wife,/ Born June 18, 1828./ Died July 28, 1904./ Lucy 1852-1911/ George F./ 1852-1914
      [S face] Ann McLean Houliston/ Died/ June 14, 1883./ Aged 57./ Charlotte Houliston/ Born Oct. 16, 1818,/ Died Oct. 6, 1898./ Andrew Houliston/ Oct. 8, 1818/ Jan. 27, 1909
      [W face] George Houliston/ Born 1778./ Died May 29, 1859./ His wife/ Agnes Archbald/ Born 1788./ Died Jan. 25, 1876./ David/ their son/ Born 1830./ Died Oct. 18, 1861./ Houliston
      [N face] Ella Pelton/ wife of/ Geo. F. Houliston/ Died Feb. 5, 1890,/ Aged 32 years./ Charles W. Houliston/ Mar. 22 1882,/ Aug. 18, 1907.

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      Notes of Russell Hastings mentioning the death of a friend (David Houliston of Willoughby) during the Civil War

      It seems that Gauley Mountain is in West Virginia

      http://www.rbhayes.org/hayes/mssfind/274/hastingsrchp13.htm#CHAPTER%2520I <http://www.rbhayes.org/hayes/mssfind/274/hastingsrchp13.htm>
      Transcript of Chapter 1 through 3
      THE CIVIL WAR MEMOIR OF RUSSELL HASTINGS
      CHAPTER I
      From Birth to July 25, 1861
      I was born in Greenfield, Mass., May 30th, 1835. I am the son of Col. Russell and Harriet A. Thayer Hastings. The old farm house where I began life still stands (1899), one mile north of Greenfield village on the Bernardston road. The little (then red) school house where I learned my A.B.C.'s also still stands, as bleak and forlorn as is the usual country school house. There was one oak standing then, now bleakness reigns supreme.

      THE CIVIL WAR
      A.D. 1861
      The cause of this stupendous Civil War has been written upon from all sides, many different causes under as many different names have been given. I have no hesitancy in giving the plain correct name - Slavery.

      1861. October 1st. Broke camp and returned to Gauley Mountain within eight miles of Gauley Bridge. Here we formed a permanent camp, naming it Camp Ewing. We sat down to await the worst enemy any army ever has, and one sure to attack a new army - Typhoid Fever. Nearly every man in my regiment was sick and more than one hundred died. At one time there were only two officers for duty, Lieutenant Thompson and myself. We went on guard every other day as guards must be kept up, for the enemy followed us on our retreat, and although not desirous of battle, he annoyed our outposts.
      One morning I came in from guard duty thinking my turn to break down had come. My Captain Moore was sick in his tent, Lieutenant Sellick B. Warren was sick at hospital and I went to my bunk feeling most miserable. I sent to the sutlers for a pint bottle of "Pike's Cordial", cherry cordial. It was a very palatable decoction of whiskey, water, sugar and something with the taste of wild cherry (might have been prussic acid). I took a good swig, put the bottle by my side and dropped off to sleep. When I next awakened I took another swig. I was in my bunk all that day and night, awakening the next morning with an empty bottle and the fever broken. I accused our cook of having drunk my cordial, but I concluded he hadn't and that my swigs must have been larger than I thought. I was excused from duty that day, but the following I was all right. Our Brigade was encamped within an area of half a mile, all sick with typhoid. How disheartening it was to hear the band playing dirges and the volley fire over the graves of our comrades! This became so frequent that an order was issued stopping such things. Only one of my intimate friends died (David Houliston, of Willoughby), though nearly all became ill and went to hospital. The convalescent sick and frequently those still very ill were sent to the hospital at Cincinnati. We did not have ambulances enough to carry them to the boat at Loup Creek, over twenty miles, so the larger number were transported in the army wagon which had brought us supplies. Think of taking a typhoid patient from his cot, jolting him over the rough mountain roads in an army wagon with only a little straw to lie upon. Strange to say none seemed the worse and some improved. The idea of going home worked marvels. From the hospital at Cincinnati they were furloughed home for thirty days. Our ranks were much reduced, but enough were left to keep up an organization. When these furloughed sick returned, the rest of us at different times during the winter took our furlough of thirty days at home.
      1861. November 13th. The fever had abated by this time and many of the sick had returned to duty. The Brigade, consisting of the 23rd, 26th and 30th Ohio Regiments, broke camp at 7 A.M. and took up the march towards Gauley Bridge, the 23rd in advance. How glad we were to leave that much hated Camp Ewing; and then we were marching towards Ohio; perhaps we would be taken out of West Virginia and sent to some more important post. How we cheered when the band struck up, "Oh, ain't I glad I'm out of the Wilderness". We were now trained soldiers, had become well drilled and disciplined, had had typhoid fever and now were as tough as nuts, nothing but bullets could hurt us. We had a jolly rollicking day's march, reached Gauley Bridge, kept on down the river towards the boat landing, crossed the Kanawha River on the ferry, thus being on the boat landing side at Loup Creek ten miles away. When we took up our line of march again it was not towards Loup Creek, but to the left up Cotton Mountain and southward toward Fayetteville. We didn't cheer so very much as we began the ascent. Back into the wilderness we turned, and after one and a half day's march reached Fayetteville, nearly opposite and across the New River from the hated Camp Ewing.

      ==========================================================================================
    Person ID I6355  Houliston Family Tree
    Last Modified 19 August 2006 

    Father George Houliston,   b. 1778, Fogo, Berwick, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1859, Willoughby, Lake, OH, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Mother Agnes Arch(i)bald,   b. 17 January 1788, Kelso, Roxburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 January 1876  (Age 88 years) 
    Married 28 June 1811  Kelso, Roxburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Marriage record of HOULISTON, GEORGE to AGNES ARCHBALD/FR1800 in 1811 in KELSO GRO ref 793/00 0006

      HOULISTON, George Marriage
      Wife: Agnes ARCHIBALD
      Marriage Date: 28 Jun 1811 Recorded in: Berwick, Wiltshire, England
      Collection: St Leonard
      Source: FHL Film 1279362 Dates: 1811 - 1811


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      GEORGE HOULISTON
      Male Family
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      Event(s):
      Birth:
      Christening:
      Death:
      Burial:
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      Marriages:
      Spouse: AGNES ARCHIBALD Family
      Marriage: 28 JUN 1811 Berwick Saint Leonards, Wiltshire, England
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      Messages:
      Extracted marriage record for locality listed in the record. The source records are usually arranged chronologically by the marriage date.
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      Source Information:
      Batch No.: Dates: Source Call No.: Type: Printout Call No.: Type:
      M153321 1723 - 1895 1279362 Film NONE
      Sheet:
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Family ID F325  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart



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